Family Dental Insurance 101

Purchasing a family dental insurance plan provides you and your family two important benefits:

• Better oral health for the entire family as most plans pay 100% of the preventive service fees such as cleaning every six months. This encourages the family to visit the dentist for regular check ups and cleaning treatments. Prevention is half the battle!

• Generate more savings because the dental insurance company pays a certain percentage of dental services for minor and major procedures.

Here are six questions to guide you in the selection of the right dental insurance plan for you and your family.

Does the plan allow you to pick your own dentist?
Some dental insurance carriers give you bigger discounted rates provided you use their network of dentists. If your favorite dentist is not part of the network, the dental insurance plan may not cover the treatment. You should consider paying extra for a plan, which allows you and your family to go to your preferred dentist.

Are there restrictions when it comes to choosing the best treatment options? Some insurance plans put a cap on the number of treatments or limit the amount paid for a condition. If you or your family has a history of poor dental health care, then you should choose a plan that has few restrictions on this aspect.

What is does the plan cover? An ideal dental insurance plan allows for one cleaning treatment every six months, with X-ray and fluoride treatments that come at little or no cost for each member. For the major procedures, some dental plans require you to pay 50 percent of the entire bill. If your family has a history of good dental health care, then you may want to negotiate for lesser coverage when it comes to the major procedures.

Which family members are covered by the family insurance plan? Most dental insurance carriers cover the spouse and dependent children, from birth through 18. Some exceptions are given for children up to the ages of 22 if the child is a full time student, and dependent on the principal for support.

Is there built in flexibility in scheduling dental appointments? Some inexpensive dental insurance plans limit when you can come in for dental treatment. Check to ensure that these scheduled appointments do not inconvenience you or your family.

How much savings does this plan generate? Whether you and your spouse decide to purchase a family dental insurance plan, or avail of your employers’ sponsored plan – you will still be able to generate savings, for you are not paying for the entire procedure.

Mansi gupta recommends that you visit http://www.dentalinsuranceplans.net/2006/01/familydentali.html for more information on Family dental insurance.

Article from articlesbase.com

Over 100 million Americans do not have dental insurance. Thousands seek help at free dental care clinics that are often overwhelmed with the high demand for their services. Seth Doane reports.

15 comments to Family Dental Insurance 101

  • jimjonesable

    why cant dentists be forced to perform work whereas hospitals will at least try to fix ya before they make you leave? i know this sounds stupid but will the healthcare reform bill insure free dental for us citizens?
    i’m just saying with all the illegal babies being born in the country w/out even having their bills paid youd think a sane country would extend dental to its own citizens since illegal aliens have zero rights.

  • visionimagify

    People need teeth. I also doubt most of these people brush their teeth daily, or floss and mouth wash as well. Remember, never go to bed with stuff in your mouth without cleaning it furst! 😀

  • visionimagify

    @NorceCodine LMAO. Yep. I wish we had NHS.

  • Lakesidedental1261

    @izlude2 I see a huge difference in the tooth decay rates of those who grew up in areas with fluoridated water and those who didn’t. Don’t blame the fluoride as your teeth would likely have far worse if you didn’t have it. You can blame, however, your dental hygiene habits.

  • Dudejrs

    hey guys im starting a dental school blog. Check it out and let me know what you think. Let me know if I should stop now or keep going.

    destinationdentalschool.blogspot.com/

  • izlude2

    I went for an exam at Western Dental. They priced my whole mouth for 5,000 dollars.
    4 Wisdom Teeth, Front Bridge, 1 extraction, 1 crown. Deep Cleaning… aye aye aye… I blame the fluoride scam going on with American Water.

  • Champ675

    Talk about a GREAT GROUP that dose something that most won’t!!!!

  • kencan98

    @NorceCodine 100 Million people CAN go to the dentist. Anyone can go to the dentist. There’s a difference between “can’t go” and “can’t pay”.

    I’d love a Benz. I CAN get one. I CAN’T pay for it. But if I could, I could get one.

  • AbigayleAbril

    Existent Be Naughty dating benaughtyman.info

  • HerrSpieldose

    I am forking out 80k for dental implants because I have bruxism and couldn’t afford a dentist to make a mouth guard from grinding which is why… not lack of care….

    I am going to school to be a drug counselor and racking up mad debt for that myself so I understand the debt issue…

  • batmanpronz

    As an entering dental student, I’m all for more affordable dental procedures, but not at the cost that almost every dental student has to pay. I know dental school will cost me around $400K, a debt that will take at the very least 15 years to pay back.

  • RondoRaven

    Wow that’s awesome there should be more temporary clinics like this one

  • wondr7

    @ScaperSteph
    Back in the 1960s, dental insurance companies (now 3rd party payers) would provide a maximum of $1000 a year to cover dental costs for a single patient. That would provide for 2 to 3 crowns a year. THAT IS STILL THE AMOUNT COVERED TODAY IN 2010!! Dental insurance is not the answer because they are big business. They change their policies almost MONTHLY to confuse dental offices and escape paying for services that patients desperately need. Insurance companies are devious.

  • wondr7

    Back in the 1960s, dental insurance companies (now 3rd party payers) would provide a maximum of $1000 a year to cover dental costs for a single patient. That would provide for 2 to 3 crowns a year. THAT IS STILL THE SAME AMOUNT COVERED TODAY IN 2010!! Dental insurance is not the answer- they change their policies almost MONTHLY to confuse dental offices and escape paying for services that patients desperately need. Why isn’t anybody investigating this??

  • wondr7

    Most in the dental field know that you are better off paying for your dental care out of pocket instead of buying dental insurance. Many dental insurance companies no longer claim to be insurance companies but “third party payers”. By advertising themselves as 3rd party payers they are able to avoid many laws our government has passed to protect subscribers. The dental ins. companies are cutting back their benefits almost daily.

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